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Jordan Chatwin

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  1. 151 votes

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    Jordan Chatwin commented  · 

    Could we please get an update on this? I'm currently artworking a huge bunch of print files for a global brand event, which involves lots of large canvas wall wraps and signage. I need to supply all large artwork with 150mm bleed. The current limit means I can't even supply the artwork at 25% to scale, I have to reduce it down to 10% scale just so I can add 15mm bleed. Crazy! What's the hold up?

    Jordan Chatwin supported this idea  · 
  2. 964 votes

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    Jordan Chatwin commented  · 

    I'm a designer working across both print and digital. One of my clients is an events agency who I frequently design and artwork large environmental graphics for (exhibition graphics, banners, window vinyl, wallpapers etc). I work 1:1 when I can, and when I can't I work at 2:4 or 1:10. The main issue for me is simply workflow. It's easier and quicker for me to work at 1:1 because I have to generate accurate mock ups to show the client and get sign off, then I have to artwork the same designs and prep them for printing.

    If I'm working 1:1 then I can simply convert my mock ups into final print files with a few simple steps and know there is no room for error. Although if I have multiple artboards at 1:1 and I can only fit one artboard on the canvas, then I sometimes need to create multiple illustrator files, which slows down my workflow.

    If I'm working at 2:4 or 1:10 to scale, I have to make sure my maths is correct, my designs are accurate (to the mm – anything that is 1mm off will be 10mm off when it's scaled up), and communicate with printers and make sure the work is scaling accurately – it just adds a layer of complexity and additional work that, with all the technology we have these days, seems unnecessary.

    I've been using Adobe products for nearly 10 years and would prefer not to change to another suite of software. But if Adobe don't fix simple quirks like these, it won't be long before the new software on the market takes over – Affinity Designer is looking more and more appealing every year. Come on Adobe, keep up.

    Jordan Chatwin supported this idea  · 

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